Thursday, December 15, 2011

yo yo yo

so, i have two girls and one boy. i think i'm more concerned about my son growing up the wrong way than i am my two daughters. anyway, my son asked if he could have a certain friend from school come over to play recently. he's a really nice kid, so i didn't mind. he's white. no problem with that.

but the boy who is about 12 or 13 started doing some rap number in the car on the drive home. he was like, "yo yo yo boyeee....yo yo....blah blah ..etc etc". i started laughing and so did one of my daughters and my son. we all thought it was funny, and then i stopped laughing.

why was that so funny? if my son had done that, i wouldn't think it was funny or cute. i definitely wouldn't want to encourage my son to think that being a rapper was something for him to aspire to. NOT AT ALL. black people don't like to admit it, but the rap world really puts black people in such a bad light, in my opinion. but it's interesting to me how a white person can sing all that nonsense and no one thinks anything of it, it's actually looked up on kind of cool for a white person to emulate a rapper. but when a black kid is doing it, it's looked upon as the expected (negative)outcome.

i don't want my son to have any desire for that life. without getting on my soapbox, the few guys who i've known who have pursued that career have turned out to be nothing but broke-down losers and hustlers. NO THANKS.

11 comments:

Danielle Miller said...

It's crazy! Nowadays all our kids see around us is everybody trying to become a famous rapper or singer.

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Thank, Q said...

I know a couple of halfway successful rappers and they're good people. Family men and all, but they're far from rich. They have a little clout in the city and all, but that's it. Most of these guys today wind up losers. It's because rap has changed. It used to be about skill and talent, but now it's about gimmick hooks and catchy beats. A genre that once had a huge influence in my life is something I can barely stand to listen to today. I think rap has always had a negative profile, but today's rappers have turned it into something even worse. Something that even turns off black people.

Joyann said...

I think the main problem is that because black people are viewed as a monolith and are generally looked down upon when it comes to the racial hierarchy, when a black kid emulates a rapper, it is as you said, viewed as the expected, and it's usually a low and stereotypical expectation. The other issue is as you alluded to, when white people "appropriate" something from another culture, it is suddenly seen as cool, trendy, and permissible for mass consumption, because there aren't any stigmas attached to white people, and they are on top of the racial hierarchy. White people are viewed as individuals, not as a monolith. Therefore, they are allowed to experiment and take on the cultural aspects of other groups, without being labeled and stereotyped.

I think that rap/hip hop needs to be viewed as a music subculture and not as the overarching culture of African-Americans. African-Americans are themselves guilty of perpetuating this idea that rap/hip hop is the overarching culture of their group, and not as just one individual subculture, amongst others. even though I listen to rap and hip hop once in a while, it definitely, they definitely are not my first choices of music and growing up, I certainly didn't want to emulate any of the artists that I saw on tv, in music videos. It just wasn't how I thought. Now,if there were other black people doing that, that's fine, because I viewed it as being a specific group of people who wanted to do that,.

Unknown said...

I think there are a lot of black artists that sell themselves short in the rap industry. I hate to say it, but many of them have voices and talent way beyond the catchy rhymes that they spew commercially. When people step outside their comfort zones for a minute it seems like we end up with some fantastic music...I loved run DMC pairing up with aerosmith and Darius Rucker going country. Surprising people by breaking stereo types is a good thing...perhaps opening a door for us all to embrace our differences and becoming one race (not by color or religion but as humans).

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AJ Linton said...

This is the problem for the Arts...it has such a NEGATIVE name. I would just say monitor your son, if he has an interest in music (help him develop it into a craft) like you would do dance. Keep a close eye/hold on him and introduce him to the right people. He's young enough to make it happen, if it doesn't work out on to another dream!

Shauntrice Art said...

I agree with you on the way rap portrays us. Hip hop has been co-opted and teaches us to embrace inferiority. This was a great post.

Anonymous said...

I am amazed at the level of self hate you express. Black girl...You need therapy!

Mr. Mcgranor said...

How's it all going?

Anonymous said...

More than likely its because you're his mother and not the other child's. It's doubtful any one in there right mind would wish that type of behavior and life style on there kid

Anonymous said...

From years of personal experience, I can tell you it is most definitely NOT socially acceptable to make hip hop music as a white person. There is an incredible stigma associated with creating with art as it relates to the artists race, most prominently with white people. By laughing at your sons friend, unfortunately you reinforce the notion that white people cannot use hip hop as a medium for expression, and thus further the racial divide.

Also, as a side note, I think it's important to mention that the majority of hip hop music is overwhelmingly positive, constructive, and conscious. The hip hop which you are describing as portraying the black community in a negative light is what most emcees would call "rap;" hollow, vapid music made exclusively to perpetuate negative black stereotypes for commercial success. Next time someone around you raps, don't laugh at them, tell them what constructive things they could rap about.